owies Siwek

 

 

 

 


owies Borowiak

 

 

 

 


owies Celer

 

 

 

 

 


owies Kasztan

 

CERTIFIED CEREAL SEEDS - OAT

Oats are a very valuable agricultural plant due to its wide use in feeding animals, nutrition values for people and phytosanitary proprieties in rotation of crops. It is particularly important in feeding horses. A relatively high protein (9.6–11.5%) and fat (4.7%) content make it a great feed for working animals and livestock. Recently growing oats for green feed, silage and dried grain, either in pure stand or in mixtures with legumes, has become popular.

The bulk of the oats production is used to produce feed. Its grains have a very high content of protein and contain significant quantities of valuable fat. The use of oats for consumption and in the cosmetics industry has become more popular. Elevated beta-glucan content in oat products contributes to lowering of cholesterol level in the blood. Oats are mostly appreciated by people in western countries, Scandinavia, USA and Canada. Healthy diet in the era of lifestyle diseases has become especially important. In Poland consumption of products containing oats is on average much lower than in other countries but it is growing steadily.

SIWEK

Hulless oats
The variety is suitable for cultivation in the whole country, except for mountainous areas and foothills
Average tolerance to soil acidity
Plant height of about 93 cm
Lodging-resistance, resistance to powdery mildew, leaf spots and septoria higher than average
Crop yield approximately 15% higher than other hulless varieties, and only 5.5% lower than traditional model varieties
1000-grain weight is about 27.8 g
Protein content: 15.9%; fat content: 7.4%
Recommended planting density: 400 - 550 plants / m2
Seed rate of 145 - 185 kg seed / ha, depending on the soil category, time of sowing and germination
Minimum standard germination percentage for hulless oats varieties was established as 75%

 

BOROWIAK

Early heading and average maturing
Yellow grain
Average 1000-grain weight
High kernel uniformity
Average husk content
Relatively high protein and fat content in the grain
Good health
Resistance to black rust higher than average
Average height of about 97 cm
Suitable for cultivation in the whole country except for mountainous areas; especially valued in the northern east
High and very high yield
Average soil requirements
Significantly higher yield in response to early sowing
Recommended sowing standard: 500 seeds/m2, i.e. 180 – 200 kg/ha

CELER

AVery early heading and relatively early maturing
Yellow grain
High 1000-grain weight
High kernel uniformity
Relatively high husk content
Low protein and fat content in the grain
Good health
High resistance to rust, good resistance to other diseases
Relatively low plants
High lodging-resistance
Suitable for cultivation in mountainous areas, where it has a high yield
Average soil requirements
Average tolerance to soil acidity
Recommended sowing standard: 550-600 seeds/m2, i.e. 210 – 230 kg/ha
Requires sowing in an optimum time

KASZTAN

Average heading and maturing time
Yellow grain
Average1000-grain weight
Average kernel uniformity
Very high protein and fat content in the grain
Average health
Relatively low plants
Average lodging-resistance
Suitable for cultivation in the whole country except for mountainous areas
High or very high yield especially in Wielkopolska region and in the south of the country
Average to low soil requirements
Average tolerance to soil acidity
Recommended sowing standard: 500 seeds/m2, i.e. 170 – 210 kg/ha
Requires sowing in an optimum time

GRAJCAR

Very early heading and maturing time
Yellow grain
Average1000-grain weight
Average kernel uniformity
Average protein and fat content in the grain
Average husk content
Good health; high resistance to rust
Suitable for cultivation in mountainous areas, where it has a high yield
Average soil requirements
Sowing standard depends on the soil category and time of sowing; recommended standard: 550-600 seeds/m2, i.e. 200– 220 kg/ha
Higher yield in response to early sowing

 

CULTIVATION RECOMMENDATIONS:

Oats grow well on all types of soil, ranging from sandy to clay, provided they are not too dry. They require plenty of water; if planted on dry soil, they have lower yield. They can be grown on both acidic and neutral soils. Oats have a high yield when grown on soil from strong cereal-forage category.

Soil preparation:

It is recommended to cultivate the soil twice a year: in autumn and in spring. Autumn cultivation is performed to loosen the soil in order to help retain water during winter time. Spring cultivation prepares soil for the sowing. Pre-winter plowing or skimming is carried out in autumn. Plowing is performed when the late plants like beets, potatoes and stubble after-crops are harvested. After collecting pre-crops, skimming and harrowing is performed; pre-winter plowing is carried out in late autumn.

In order to minimize water loss in the soil, spring pre-sowing crops should be kept to a strict minimum, i.e. shallow aggregate cultivation (5-6 cm) or direct aggregate sowing is recommended.

Fertilization:

The level of mineral fertilization depends on pre-crops, soil richness and expected yield. Approximate doses of fertilizers should be 50-90 kg N, 35-70 kg P2O5 per ha and 60–100 kg K2O per ha. Assuming fertilization of 90 kg N per ha, use 2/3 of a dose before sowing and 1/3 in the phase of stem shooting.  Phosphorus and potassium fertilizers should be entirely applied before sowing. They must be well mixed with the top layer of soil. Among cereals, oats have the highest magnesium requirements (20-25 kg MgO per ha). Liming should be performed regularly every 4 years, in rotation: for heavier soils –burnt lime, for lighter soils – soil lime.

Sowing:

Early sowing provides plants with more water from the ground, prolongs their vegetation period and thus their feeding period. Therefore the earlier is the sowing, the more beneficial it is to plants. Late sowing is the most damaging for spring cereals like wheat and oat and results in lower yield. Sowing of oats should be conducted as early as possible , right after the soil gets dry. Sowing after first ten days of April always results in lower yield. A seed rate of 500 – 650 seeds per m2 is recommended, depending on soil type and fertility.

Rotation of crops:

Good pre-crop for oats are sugar and fodder beet, corn grown for grain and silage, late varieties of potatoes, perennial pea plants plowed in late autumn, legumes, which mature late as well as stubble after-crop.